How to Go Snowshoeing With Your Dogs?

Dogs are often our best friends. They show us unconditional love and we can’t help but adore them. It’s only natural that we want to spend as much time with them as possible. So, what better way than going snowshoeing? Granted, every dog is different and not all breeds of dogs enjoy the outdoors like others do. But there are some breeds that actually prefer being outside in cold weather! If you’re thinking about taking your pup for a walk on the ice this winter, here are five tips to make it an enjoyable experience for everyone involved!

What is snowshoeing and why should you do it with your dogs?

It is a sport where the participants walk on specially designed shoes that are meant to distribute your weight in order for you not to sink into snow. Dogs enjoy being outside, especially if it’s cold and snowy. Snowshoeing allows them to stay active during wintertime when there’s limited outdoor activities dogs can do. Plus, they might just surprise you by loving this activity! Dont forget your pup needs water on the trip bring along a Collapsible Silicone Expandable Water Bowl

A bit more about what exactly is “snowshoeing” it’s a popular winter sport similar to cross country skiing, but with larger footwear attached with crampons (spikes). They’re usually made of lightweight aluminum or other metal alloys instead of steel which makes it easier both for dogs and their owners who wear these shoes while walking.

It is a great cardiovascular workout for you and your dog, as well as an opportunity to explore the beautiful winter scenery! Dogs are more than welcome in many snowshoe trails across Canada and US like those found at Algonquin Park  in Ontario or Teton National Park  in Wyoming.

Another benefit of snowshoeing with dogs is that it’s one of the safest sports around because there aren’t any chances that your pet will get injured while doing this activity (unlike other outdoor activities such as skiing , mushing etc.). Your four legged friend can even carry his own backpack so he feels included.

How to gear up for a day of snowshoeing with your dog?

Just like any other winter activity, snowshoeing requires you and your dog to have proper gear. Depending on where you will go snowshoeing with your furry buddy – it can be as simple as boots (for both of you) or something more complex if conditions are harsh. Make sure that all clothing is waterproof!

You’ll need a good set of warm clothes for yourself: hat, scarf, gloves/mittens etc. As well as some lightweight yet extremely durable hiking shoes made for the cold weather; don’t forget about socks which also matter because they should fit comfortably and not cause blisters during long walks in icy terrain. Also make sure that there’s no metal objects such as zippers or studs on your boots or shoes that may hurt the dog’s paws.

If you’re going for a full day out – having some food and water is crucial! Don’t forget about extra layers of clothing if it gets really cold (i.e. thermal underwear, jackets etc.) as well as an emergency whistle in case something happens to one of you during the walk; always be prepared!

Last but certainly not least: make sure that proper identification tags with contact information are attached to your pup just in case he runs too far ahead into bushes and can’t find his way back home 🙂 It’s also good practice when going outdoors with dogs because they could get lost while playing outside so this will help them come back safely even without their owner

How to Go About Picking Out the Right Pair of Snowshoes for You and Your Pup?

There are two main types of snowshoes that can be used by both you and your dog – backcountry or trail models. The difference is in the size: while regular ones fit human feet, smaller versions are made for dogs! Make sure they’re lightweight enough not to interfere with your pet’s movements but sturdy enough so he doesn’t feel any discomfort walking on them.

Your pooch will also definitely need a special kind of leash which should allow him some freedom when running around (after all it’s his walk too!) but still keep him close to you at all times.

Another thing worth mentioning about choosing proper gear is harnesses . If you don’t want to turn this activity into between man and beast just because your dog pulls on the leash all the time – this is a good solution for you. Just like with traditional harnesses, there are different types to choose from depending on your pet’s size and preferences but make sure that they’re made of high quality materials so it doesn’t come off during walks (otherwise he may get lost).

Conclusion

This article is a helpful guide for all the winter enthusiasts in your life. Dogs need to be prepared before they go on any type of adventure, and snowshoeing with them is no exception! With this information you will know how to dress up their paws so they can enjoy an outdoor excursion without getting too cold or tired out from running around. We hope that by reading through these tips, you are able to plan a fun-filled day outside with your furry friends. Good luck and happy adventuring!

 

 

Dog Training Collar – Making Your Dog More Manegeable

Dog training collars always looked so mean to me especially the choker collars. I had one for my dog when I was little. My dad used it to train my dog. Apparently, as the breeder and trainer said, they were the only really efficient way to train your dog.

However my dad was nice with ours. A little slight yank to get the point across and my dog was sure to respond. However, I have seen people be positively vicious with them; to the point that the dog cried out in pain. This of course is not surprising when the dog is lifted off of their feet by a chain that is choking the air out of them.

To me the whole dog training collar thing seems to kind of go against a lot of the other stuff I have read. Everyone seems to say that you should not yell at your dog when they do something wrong, but instead show them the correct behavior and praise them for it. To this end the choker collar seems to be a little out of the scope of things. I’m not positive but I am pretty sure that choking your dog, whether lightly or almost to the point of death can not be considered positive reinforcement.

There must be other dog training collars that work just as well but, then again maybe not since the chocker seems to be the most prevalent. I also have just learned of another atrocity in this area, as my friend sitting next to me just apprised me of the fact that some collars have studs so that when the owner chokes the dog the dog also gets stabbed; sounds so humane and efficient doesn’t it?

Doggie Dynamics: Potty Training Your Pooch

If you’re thinking about adding a member to your family, you’ll also want to consider that, that means having one more mouth to feed, and someone else to clean up after. And, this is especially true if you’re considering a pet.

According to experts its imperative to teach pets, especially puppies about proper hygiene as soon and as early as possible. But, they note that you must remain realistic and not expect too much. Remember, much like babies, puppies are still in their formative years and should not be expected to have full or adequate control of their sphincter muscle. In fact, professionals point out that it’s not uncommon for puppies up to six months old to use the living room floor or rug as a “potty”. However, they note that with proper patience, love, and persistent training, such problems can be put in the past.

Denote a spot where your puppy IS allowed to “go” and point it out, making it obvious to him or her that’s what the spot should be used for. Note his or her patterns and bring him or her to the spot soon after he or she wakes up and after eating, drinking or playing. If however your catch your canine peeing or pooping in an inappropriate spot, simply “escort” him or her to the proper area reinforcing it as an acceptable bathroom spot.

Make sure also to keep a system of proper scolding and rewarding for behaviors. Compliment your pooch verbally and rub his or her ears and back each time he or she goes to the right spot, and after a few compliments, you may also want to consider scolding when he or she disobeys. And, make sure that the “punishment” fits the “crime” and takes place immediately after the incident so that your pet can make the proper association.

Success say experts depends on repetition of action. Taking that into account, they suggest planning meals at regular times and intervals, about three times a day. And they suggest teaching your pet to ration his or her food by offering a large bowl of food and allowing him or her to figure out how often the bowl will be replenished.

Dog Training Secrets

Every dog and every dog owner has his or her own unique dog training challenges. Each breed of dog has a different temperament as does each individual dog. And dog owners are no different. Despite the differences, there are some basic things in common for training all dogs.

No matter why you have a dog, he should at least have some very elementary dog training. No one wants a dog who isn’t housebroken, who runs away or into the street, who won’t sit, come or stay when you want him to. Both you and your dog will be happier with a little common ground on obedience training.

One of the first things to take into account when dog training is that dogs are programmed for a world of leaders and followers. You have to be the leader in your relationship. Signs of a leader are absolute consistency. Know what you want your dog to do and keep that constant from day to day and training session to training session. Don’t shout. That is a sign that you have lost control. And keep your dogs attention focused on you during the entire training session.

Attention is the second important thing to keep in mind for dog training and one of the hardest to maintain. It has been said that ninety percent of dog training is getting and keeping his attention. Dogs are very much like small children and have short attention spans. Keep training sessions short – 20 minutes is fine, or even a couple of 10 minute sessions. Work with your dog in a quiet environment that is free of distractions. Talk to your dog in a quiet voice. Use his name and explain what you want him to do. He may understand no more than, “Blah blah blah, Toby”, but your voice will keep him focused in your direction.

Experts have found that positive dog training is more effective that a system of rewards and punishment. A dog who looks forward to training sessions as fun and full of rewards is a dog who will learn faster and better. Reward accomplishments with treats or words of praise or pats. As your dog learns new skills, you can reward him for each step along the way. If he doesn’t respond the way you want, rethink what you are asking him to do and how you are asking him to do it. What worked as a dog training method for one dog may not work as well for the next. Your dog may need to review some more basic dog training lessons before going on to new lessons. Rather than punishment, a stern NO, blocking a movement with your hands, or withholding rewards when he doesn’t perform, and remaining consistent are the best ways to encourage your dog to exhibit the behavior you want. Remember that it is in his nature (as well as yours) to want to test limits and see how much he can get away with. Consistency in dog training and rewards are what get positive results, not punishments.

Dogs are very much like us. They want to follow a leader they respect. And dog training is just like school. They like to do things that are fun and make them feel good, where they get rewards for accomplishing what is asked of them. And they want the same thing their owners want, a happy and safe relationship with the ones they are love. A little dog obedience training will go a long way in making this happen.

Dog Training part III – Communicating with the dog

Fundamentally, dog training is about communication. From the human perspective the handler is communicating to the dog what behaviors are correct, desired, or preferred in what circumstances. From the canine perspective the handler must communicate what behaviors will give the dog the most satisfaction to his natural instincts and emotions. Without that inner satisfaction a dog will not work well.

A successful handler must also understand the communication that the dog sends to the handler. The dog can signal that he is unsure, confused, nervous, happy, excited, and so on. The emotional state of the dog is an important consideration in directing the training, as a dog that is stressed or distracted will not learn efficiently.

According to Learning Theory there are a four important messages that the handler can send the dog:

Reward or release marker
Correct behavior. You have earned a reward. For example, “Free” followed by a reward.

Bridge
Correct behavior. Continue and you will earn a reward. For example, “Good”.

No reward marker
Incorrect behavior. Try something else. For example, “Uh-uh” or “Try again”.

Punishment marker
Incorrect behavior. You have earned punishment. For example, “No”.

Using consistent signals or words for these messages enables the dog to understand them more quickly. If the handler sometimes says “good” as a reward marker and sometimes as a bridge, it is difficult for the dog to know when he has earned a reward.

Rewards can be treats, play, praise, or anything that the dog finds rewarding. Failure to reward after the reward marker diminishes the value of the reward marker and makes training more difficult.

These four messages do not have to be communicated with words, and nonverbal signals are often used. In particular, mechanical clickers are frequently used for the reward marker. Hand signals and body language also play an important part in learning for dogs.

Dogs usually do not generalize commands easily; that is, a dog who has learned a command in a particular location and situation may not immediately recognize the command to other situations. A dog who knows how to “down” in the living room may suffer genuine confusion if asked to “down” at the park or in the car. The command will need to be retaught in each new situation. This is sometimes called “cross-contextualization,” meaning the dog has to apply what’s been learned to many different contexts.

Next: Dog Training part IV – Reward and punishment

Dog Training part II – Age for early training

Dog training begins virtually at birth. Dogs that are handled and petted by humans regularly during the first eight weeks of life are generally much more amenable to being trained and living in human households. Ideally, puppies should be placed in their permanent homes between about 8 and 10 weeks of age. In some places it is against the law to take puppies away from their mothers before the age of 8 weeks. Before this age, puppies are still learning tremendous amounts of socialization skills from their mother. Puppies are innately more fearful of new things during the period from 10 to 12 weeks, which makes it harder for them to adapt to a new home.

Puppies can begin learning tricks and commands as early as 8 to 12 weeks of age; the only limitations are the pup’s stamina, concentration, and physical coordination. It is much easier to live with young dogs that have already learned basic commands such as sit. Waiting until the puppy is much older and larger and has already learned bad habits makes the training much more difficult.

There are some professional trainers who disagree with this idea, particularly those who train working dogs, detection dogs, police dogs, etc. They feel that obedience work shouldn’t start until the dog is at least a year old, or after the prey drive has fully developed. These trainers also take the position that spaying and neutering is harmful to the training process, again because of its negative impact on the dog’s prey drive.

Next: Dog Training part III – Communicating with the dog

Dog Training Career: What is Involved?

A dog training career may be just right for you, if you love working with dogs. Dogs of all ages, from puppies to older dogs, need training, and their owners often don’t know how to train them. They look for a professional dog trainer to do the job.

If you are thinking of a dog training career, you might want to start by practicing on your own dog. If you are good at training your dog, you might be good at training other people’s dogs. But if training your dog leaves you frustrated and drained, then becoming a dog trainer might not be the best career for you.

When you are training dogs, you are actually training the owners more than the dogs, so you need to be good with people to consider a dog training career. People are not at their best when they are frustrated or embarrassed by their dog’s behavior. Will you be able to deal with these distraught owners calmly, while at the same time tending to their dogs? Give this some thought.

Consider volunteering to help out at a dog training class at your local shelter. You will get a feel for what is involved in a dog training career. If you are good, the teacher may let you teach a segment of the class. This will be your trial by fire. If you do a good job, then you can move forward with your training.

You can prepare for a dog training career in several ways.

1. Attend a school specifically for those interested in a dog training career. There are many schools and seminars available. Be sure to get lots of hands on training.

2. Become an intern or apprentice to a dog trainer in your area. This way, you can learn dog training on the job.

3. Become a certified dog trainer. Do a search on the internet for dog training certification programs.

Once you have the proper education in dog training, starting your business should be easy. Decide if you want to work with individual clients in their homes or offer dog training classes. It is a good idea to offer a combination of both. By advertising your dog training classes, people who want individual help training their dogs will hear about you too. Soon your dog training career will be off to a great start.

Check around in your area for facilities where you can hold the dog training classes. Often the local humane society will have space for classes, or you could check with dog day care facilities. In warm weather, you may be able to hold your classes outdoors.

Advertise your services by leaving brochures about your training program with veterinarians, dog supply stores, and pet shelters. This way, your advertising will not cost you much.

Congratulations! You have followed the steps above and have a thriving dog training career. You love dogs and are working with them every day. For a dog lover and a natural teacher, you have found the ideal business to be in.

Dog Training: When To Reprimand And When To Reward

There are a lot of things people have to remember when they start dog training. There are a lot of different dog training techniques to try.

Some of these dog training techniques work, while other dog training techniques seem to work against you. With so many different aspects of dog training, it is hard to know what techniques work the best.

One of the biggest things that often confuse people with regards to dog training is when to reward your dog and when to reprimand your dog. If you have trouble deciding when to do which, please read on.

Most dog training course instructors will tell you that positive dog training is the best technique to utilize. Unfortunately, there are some instances when you do have to reprimand your dog.

Reprimanding your dog should not happen often, as dogs respond better to positive reinforcement used in dog training. Before you learn when to reprimand your dog, you should first learn when to reward your dog.

You should reward your dog any time your dog does something it is supposed to during dog training. This can be when it sits, stays, eliminates where it should, fetches, etc.

The reward you use during your dog training can be many things: praise, kind words, tummy rub, pat on the head, or a treat.

Dogs learn very quickly from positive dog training. Dogs tend to want to make you happy and this is why they do so well with this type of dog training. However, be sure you never reward bad behavior.

Reprimanding is a type of dog training that should not be done unless necessary. This can be when your dog jumps, eliminates in the wrong place, barks, growls, pulls on a leash, destroys something, etc.

You must only reprimand your dog if you catch it in the act of doing something wrong.

Otherwise, your dog will not realize what it did. The reprimand used for this dog training should be a quick, sharp “no” or “bad dog.”

Your tone should be angry, but remember to be short and quick. If you constantly do this, your words will end up being ignored by the dog. Never spank, hit, or constantly scold your dog. This will only lead to more problems in the future.

These are all of the important things you need to focus on when determining when to reprimand or reward your dog during dog training. Remember to be patient because your dog is learning and trying its best.

With some love and consideration, your dog should do quite well with its dog training.

Then it will be a rewarding experience for you both!

Dog Training – The Best Method To Train Your Dog Fast Without Touching Them

Reward training is often seen as the most modern method of training a dog, but reward training is probably much older than other methods of dog training. It is possible that reward training for dogs has been around as long as there have been dogs to train. Early humans probably used some informal kind of reward training when taming the wolf pups that eventually evolved into modern dogs.

Many principles of modern reward training date back many decades. However, what is called reward training today has only enjoyed is remarkable popularity for the past 10 or 15 years.

Many reward training enthusiasts are less enthusiastic about other methods of dog training, such as the traditional leash and collar method. However, the best approach to training any individual dog is often a combination of leash/collar training and reward training.

In addition, a training method that works perfectly for one dog may be totally inappropriate for another, and vice versa. Some dogs respond wonderfully to reward training and not at all to leash and collar training, while others respond to leash/collar training and are not at all motivated by reward training. Most dogs fall somewhere in the middle of these two extremes.

Clicker training is one of the most popular forms of reward training these days. While clicker training is not the answer for every dog, it can be a remarkably effective method of training many dogs. In clicker training, the dog is taught to associate a clicking sound with a reward, like a treat. The trainer clicks the clicker when the dog does something good, followed immediately by a treat. Eventually, the dog learns to respond to the clicker alone.

Most reward training uses some sort of food reward, or a reward that is associated with getting food. In most cases, complex behaviors can only be taught using this kind of positive reinforcement, and you will find that the people who train dogs for movies and television use reward training almost exclusively.

Reward training is used in all forms of dog training, including police work and military applications. Most scent detection, tracking and police dogs are trained using some form of reward training. Reward training is also a very effective way to teach many basic obedience commands.

Reward training often incorporates the use of a lure in order to get the dog into the position desired by the trainer. The lure is used to get the dog to perform the desired behavior on his or her own and of his or her own free will.

It makes a great deal of sense to get the dog to perform the desired behavior without any physical intervention on the part of the handler. Getting the dog to perform a behavior without being touched is important.

After the dog has performed the desired behavior, it is given a reward, also called a positive reinforcement. Treats are often used as reinforcers, but praise, such as “good dog” or a pat on the head, can also be effective rewards.

Making a dog that has been reward trained a reliable dog is important, especially when the dog has an important job, like police work or drug detection, to do. For that reason it is important to get the dog accustomed to working around distractions, and to properly socialize the animal to both people and other animals.

Many dog trainers make the mistake of only training the dog inside the house or back yard, and only when the handler is there. In order to become a reliably trained companion, the dog must be taken outside the confines of its safety zone and introduced to novel situations.

It is also important to teach the dog to pay attention to the handler at all times. Having the attention of the dog means having control of the dog. Reward training is very effective at getting the respect and the attention of the dog when used properly.

Dog Training – Discover What Training Is The Best Way And Foundation To Accomplish Many Types Of Dog Trainings

There are many different styles of dog training, and finding the one that works best for you is important for creating a dog that is a talented, loyal and faithful member of the family. All successful methods of dog training work to reinforce the relationship between dog and handler, and the foundation of any successful training program is getting the respect of the dog. Fortunately, dogs are wired by nature to seek out leaders, and to follow the direction of those leaders.

Both leash/collar training and reward training have been around for a very long time, and they have proven their effectiveness over time. The type of training that works best will vary from dog to dog, and from breed to breed. It is important to remember that each breed of dog has its own unique qualities, reinforced by hundreds of years of selective breeding.

The leash and training collar is the most basic piece of equipment used in training a dog. Using the lead and training collar properly is vital to successful dog training. The training collar is designed to apply a specific amount of pressure each time the leash is tightened. The amount of pressure put on the leash controls the amount of pressure placed on the training collar, and the pressure can be adjusted according to how the dog responds.

Of course personalities of individual dogs vary quite a bit, even within established breeds. You, as the owner of the dog, know better than anyone which style of dog training will work best, so it is important to work with the trainer you choose to achieve your goal of a willing, obedient and friendly dog.

Leash and collar training is the best way to accomplish many types of dog training, particularly in situations where the dog must have a high level of reliability. For instance, dogs that have an important job to do, such as rescue dogs, police dogs and guard dogs, generally benefit from leash and collar training.

The first part of training with collar and leash, of course, is to purchase a quality, well made training collar that will fit your dog properly. There are many types of training collars and leashes on the market. The most important thing is to choose one that is sturdy and well made. The last thing you want to do is chase your dog down after he has broken his collar.

The length of the collar should be approximately two inches longer than the circumference of the dog’s neck. It is important to accurately measure the dog’s neck using a measuring tape. In order to get an accurate measurement, you must make sure that the tape is not tight around the dog’s neck.

In a collar and leash based dog training program, first the dog is taught a particular behavior, generally with the leash. After the dog has demonstrated that it understands the command, the leash is then used to correct the dog if it disobeys, or when it makes a mistake. The leash is the main form of controlling and communicating with the dog in leash and collar training.

When using leash and collar training, the dog must be trained to trust the handler and accept his or her directions without question. In order for the dog to be fully trained, the handler must demonstrate the ability to place the dog into a posture or position he or she does not want to take. This does not mean using force, but it does generally require some level of physical manipulation. This manipulation is most easily and safely done using the main tool of leash and collar training – the leash.

The well trained dog is one who will walk at his owner’s side on a loose lead, neither dropping behind nor charging ahead.

The well trained dog will also vary his pace to meet that of his handler. Under no circumstances should the handler be forced to change his or her pace to match that of the dog.

If the dog does begin to charge ahead, it is important to correct the dog promptly by giving a quick tug on the leash. This will give the dog a good reminder that he needs to change his pace. It is important to quickly relieve the pressure as soon as the dog responds. The training collar is designed to relieve pressure as soon as the leash is loosened.

Most dogs will immediately respond to corrections by a good, properly used training collar. If the dog does not respond as directed, it may be necessary to apply greater pressure. This can be especially true of large dogs or those who have preexisting behavior or control problems. If you are still unable to get a response from your dog, it is possible that you are using a training collar that is not large enough for your dog. If you think this may be the case, be sure to ask for expert advice before proceeding.