Dog Sicknesses Symptoms & Diagnosis

The downside of dog ownership is that communication can sometimes be a guessing game. This is particularly true when your dog is not feeling well.Sometimes your dog may just be “off” – not as energetic or acting odd. This may be nothing but it could be a sign of a serious health issue. Educating yourself in the signs that indicate all is not right with your dog can mean the difference between life and death.

Bloat:
If your dog’s belly starts to swell for no apparent reason, this could be an indication that she is suffering from Bloat – a condition in which the abdomen fills with gas to the point that it will become tight enough to play like a drum. This is a very serious condition as it can decrease her circulation and must be treated by a vet immediately.

Fainting:
Often related to heart disease, fainting can occur when your dog gets excited and his heart has failed to pump enough blood to his brain. Fainting can also be caused by low glucose levels in the blood which is often a result of strenuous exercise. Either way, if your dog faints, take him to the vet ASAP.

Falling:
When a dog falls over for no apparent reason, it can be an indication that she has an inner ear infection. This is very treatable and can be cured with a trip to the vet and a course of antibiotics.

Heat Stroke:
One of the most common summer ailments dog suffer from is heat stroke. This can come on very rapidly even if your dog has not been outside in the heat for a prolonged period of time. If your dog shows any of the following signs, move him to a shady spot and pour cool water all over his body and then take him to the vet immediately:

* Heavy panting
* Glazed eyes
* Rapid pulse
* Bright red gums
* Unsteadiness
* Vomiting

Shock:
A dog can suffer from four different types of shock: hypovolemic, cardiac, neurogenic or septic. All four exhibit similar symptoms including:

* Pale mucous membranes (inside of the mouth, gums, eyes, etc.)
* Weakness
* Rapid pulse
* Tangible loss of heat to the extremities, particularly the ears.

The most common type of shock is hypovolemic, occurring when there is not enough blood circulating throughout the body. The cause can include internal or external bleeding or poor circulation. Cardiac shock occurs when the heart cannot pump blood fast enough. Neurogenic shock, although rare, can occur when the dog suffers a massive brain or spinal cord injury. Septic shock occurs when an infection has reached the blood stream.

If your dog exhibits any of these symptoms or experiences any type of injury that can cause shock, take him to the vet immediately.

Get To Know A Veterinarian

If you are a pet owner, it is time that you got to know a veterinarian. Why? Because, quite simply, a veterinarian is like a doctor for your pets. If you enjoy pets enough to own one or many, then you should take the time, energy and money to properly take care of those beloved pets.

Some pet owners believe that a visit to a veterinarian is only necessary when a pet is suffering or ill. And while you definitely want to visit a veterinarian when your pets become ill or start to show abnormal symptoms, you should also schedule routine appointments for your pets just like you schedule regular appointments for you and your family to visit a physician. There is no good reason not to give your pets the best care that you possibly can. Many simple problems and sicknesses can be prevented or solved easily by early detection, even in pets, so make it a priority to see your veterinarian regularly.

New pet owners should make appointments immediately to see a veterinarian and get a full health check for your new friend. Let your veterinarian teach you all about your new pet. Learn about the best ways to care for your pet, the best food to feed it, the best ways to bathe it, and the levels of activity that are necessary for keeping your pet healthy. You may be surprised how much there is to learn about each variety of different pets. Whether you have a dog, a cat, a bird or a horse, I guarentee you that a veterinarian will teach you helpful tips that you didn’t already know.

If you are currently a pet owner and have never taken the time to schedule and appointment for your pets, do so now. Talk to your other pet-owning friends to see what veterinarians are respected in your area. Flipping through your phonebook or doing a simple internet search can also help you explore options for finding the right veterinarian in your area. Some vets specialize in certain animals, so be sure that you schedule a visit with a veterinarian that has vast experience with your particular pets.

If you think that making appointments for your pets to see a veterinarian is silly, then I wonder whether or not you are suited to be a pet owner. You must consider your lifestyle and your ability to provide the right level of care for pets. Be honest with yourself and know that it is much better to give up a pet you already own than to keep that pet and not care for it properly.

Get Your Dog To Stop Whining

Dear Mr. Katz

We have a 15-16 month old German Shorthaired Pointer named Copper. She is pretty well obedience trained (if a dog can be that). We have used a pinch collar and an electronic collar for her training. The one thing we would like to solve is her whining. I would like to find out what we could do to eliminate it. When we corrected her in the past for whining she’ll stop for a few seconds, but then start right back up again. My first instinct is to continue to correct until she stops, but I wanted to get your opinion on the topic first.

Thank You,
Mark

Dear Mark,

This tends to be a genetically motivated behavior. That is, we see some breeds that do it more than others.

In any event, it’s unlikely that using a leash or e-collar correction will work for this behavior, or you’d have already seen results. (Note: It does work on some dogs if applied consistently).

Here’s what you’ll need to do:

1. Recognize that it’s an anxiety-based behavior. The anxiety is usually the result of your dog not being able to contain her excitement for getting involved with the situation around her. For example, if the dog is made to hold a down-stay, but she sees another dog playing with a ball in the distance. This is when your dog will start whining.

2. PAY ATTENTION: Most owners will release their dog from the down-stay at this point, thus rewarding their dog for whining. Instead, wait until the dog is quiet for at least FIVE seconds before releasing the dog.

3. It is your job to convince the dog that: The longer she stays silent, the more likely it is that she will be rewarded with the ball/food/play/praise or whatever you’re using as a motivator.

4. Be sure to NEVER reward the whining. Even though it may be a hassle in the beginning.

5. Recognize that you may never completely eliminate whining, but you should be able to minimize it to the point where it is no longer an annoyance.

That’s all for now, folks!
Adam

Dogs During Labor

Breeding dogs is an exciting experience. From the time a proper mate is found to the point that the puppies are born, it is crucial to take careful steps to make this successful.

Professional breeders do not breed frequently and will only do so when a pair is found to be healthy that will ensure the birth of healthy offspring.

The ideal breeder should have the pair of dogs tested for every possible disease as well as have all the information regarding the pair’s ancestors and health records on file. Should a breeder find no problem in the history of the pair, then the process can begin.

Dogs normally come into heat twice a year which is every six months. Larger dogs can come into heat every eight or ten months which usually lasts about three weeks. Vaginal bleeding is a sure sign that the dog is in heat as well as swelling in the vulva.
A dog’s pregnancy or gestation period lasts between 60 to 67 days. Most dogs give birth after 63 days.

The only way to determine the stage of the dog’s pregnancy is by keeping the track of time from the day of the breeding. Keeping a record of this on file is advisable for reference purposes.

Exactly three weeks after breeding, the mother must be examined to confirm the pregnancy.

The dog must be given a formulated and premium brand of dog food for the duration of the pregnancy and throughout the nursing period preferably with strong nutritional foundation.

During pregnancy, the mother’s food consumption will almost double compared to the pre-pregnancy level so increased feeding must be given to ensure that there is enough for both the dog and the puppies.

Behavioral changes are to be expected during this time. The dog will demand for more affection or may experience a few days of vomiting.

Later on, the expectant mother will search for a secure place to deliver the puppies. So, one must ensure that a proper place is ready when the time comes. An ideal place for an expecting mother is a box. Depending on the size of the dog, it must be spacious enough for the dog to move around and must have layers of newspaper inside it that will absorb birthing fluids. This should also have low sides for the mother to look outside and for the breeder to easily check if assistance is needed to make it easy to remove soiled papers without interrupting the mother and the newborn puppies.

Dog Identification Tips

According to the American Humane Society, just 15% of dogs in shelters ever find their way home again. Thankfully, these loved pooches had identification, enabling shelter personnel to contact and return them to their owners. With such discouraging statistics, it becomes clear how important it is to tag or identify your new puppy.

Even if your dog doesn’t go outside much or is always in your company, you must identify him or her. Windows and doors can be left open, offering your pup a too-tempting escape to the outside world. What should you do to keep your pup safe at home?

There are several ways to ID your pet to prevent against loss or theft. Ideally, implement at least two methods to ensure a safe return should your dog go missing.

Tattoos and microchips provide permanent ways to identify your dog. Shelters, veterinarians, and research laboratories know to look for these keys when animals are brought to their facilities.

• Tattoos: this permanent identification system involves tattooing a code onto the dog’s skin, often inside the outer ear or on the inside of its leg. Veterinarians or trained specialists will ink the code for you. You will need to list your dog with one of the many tattoo registry programs around the country.

• Microchips: these minuscule electronic chips are embedded under your dog’s skin. Because special scanners are needed to read the information located on the chip, most veterinarians, shelters, and research laboratories have these on hand to scan all strays for identification. Several registries offer membership for dogs with microchips.

While tattoos and microchips offer excellent safety measurements at a reasonable cost, the fact is most people don’t know to look for a tattoo or have the means available to scan for microchips. As a result, it’s essential you provide your pup with an ID tag worn on its collar. ID tags are often the first thing searched for when a stray is found by someone.

At a minimum, the tag should list a current phone number. Because people move and phone numbers change often, a second phone number of a trusted friend or family member is also recommended. If space is available, additional information to include is: your puppy’s name, your address, and any medical conditions.

Luckily, dog ID tags are not expensive to purchase, so it should be one of the first things you get your dog, once you’ve chosen a name. You can usually find just the right tag, too, that fits your lifestyle and your pet’s personality. Tags come in different materials, such as aluminum, brass, stainless steel or plastic, and in a variety of shapes and colors. Today’s glamour pooch can even have his or her own tag made of Swarovski crystals! When it comes to choosing a fun dog ID tag, the choices are limitless.

Whatever methods you use when protecting your pet against loss or theft, please remember to keep the contact information current. Just a few minutes of your time to update registry information or purchase a new dog tag can make all the difference in the world in your beloved dog’s life.

Reasons Your Dog Destroys His Toys: What Can You Do?

 

Have you ever watched your dog chew and destroy their toys? They may be cute, but they can also get expensive. Why do dogs seem to love destroying their toys so much? There are a few reasons why this might happen. In this blog post, we will discuss common reasons that dogs destroy their toys and what you can do about it!

What are Dog Toys?

The first thing to mention is what dog toys are. Dog toys come in a variety of shapes and sizes but they all have one main purpose: entertaining and engaging with your canine companion!

What Causes Dogs to Destroy Their Toys?

There are many reasons why dogs destroy their toys during playtime. Some common ones include:

  • The toy may be too hard, causing them discomfort while chewing the toy or playing tug-of-war games with it.
  • You could’ve given them an old, worn out toy that has lost its appeal.
  • They might not like how it smells (or taste) because of where you got it from or the materials used to make it.

Let’s take a closer look at the top reasons why your dog might destroy their toys.

  • Dogs are natural hunters – they love chasing things and ripping them apart.
  • A dog may have a strong prey drive, which means he’s more likely to destroy his toys.
  • Some dogs are just aggressive by nature.
  • If your dog is bored or not getting enough exercise, he’ll be more destructive in general.
  • Sometimes the toy itself can cause problems – if it has loose parts that fall off easily, for example.

Importance of Dog Toys

Many people might not think too much about it, but dog toys are an important part of a canine’s life. They provide mental stimulation and can serve as substitute prey when your pup is feeling restless or bored.

Listed below are some of the benefits of playing with your pet using toys:

  • Toys help dogs practice their predatory skills without harming anyone or anything. Imagine if they only had humans to play with!
  • Dog chew sticks also offer them hours of satisfying chewing that helps keep their teeth clean and healthy while providing entertainment at the same time. You should consider getting one for your pup today!

How To Stop Your Dogs From Chewing On Their Toys?

There are many things you can do to help your pup not destroy their toys. Some helpful tips include:

  • Feeding a healthy diet that doesn’t contain any sugar or other substances as these can cause increased chewing and licking behaviors in some dogs.
  • Try giving them chew sticks, which provide hours of satisfying chewing while keeping teeth clean and healthy at the same time – You could also try providing an interactive treat toy to give him something to do!

Conclusion

A dog’s need to chew on objects is an instinctual behavior. Chewing helps a pup clean her teeth, which can help prevent tartar buildup and other oral issues. Toys that are too hard or don’t have enough soft parts for the dog to chew on will result in destruction of said toy and may lead your pet to find something else around the house they could get their jaws onto. Softer toys with more nooks and crannies should make it easier for your dog to enjoy playing without destroying everything in sight!